Company agrees to pay $280K in overtime

7 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

 

From San Jose Mercury News:

 

SANTA CLARA – A Santa Clara manufacturing company must pay more than $280,000 in unpaid overtime and civil damages to 38 current and former employees after a federal investigation found widespread wage violations, the U.S. Department of Labor announced Wednesday.

 

 

The Labor Department’s Wage and Hour Division determined that the firm Advanced Design, Engineering & Manufacturing, LCC, also known as Adem, deliberately falsified records to disguise overtime worked by the employees as regular time, according to Michael Eastwood, assistant director of the division’s San Jose office.

 

 

Full article here

 

 

If you’ve been the victim of unpaid overtime call 1-800-JOB-LAWS or submit your information on this page.

 

 

 

 

Planet Fitness Franchisee Settles Discrimination Lawsuit

11 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

Owners of the Planet Fitness Ewing (NJ), aka New England Fitness Ewing Inc., agreed yesterday to pay $25,000 to settle a discrimination lawsuit brought by a former employee, according to an announcement from the New Jersey Attorney General’s Office.

 

Rachel Bronner, who is African-American, worked for Planet Fitness Ewing from June 2012 through early March 2013. In May 2013 she filed a complaint with the federal Equal Employment OpporRetunity Commission (EEOC) alleging that she was wrongly passed over for a promotion and subsequently terminated because of her race and gender.

 

The settlement agreement states that Planet Fitness Ewing settled the claim while still denying “allegations that it unlawfully discriminated” against the employee, and that “the payment does not reflect any admission of wrongdoing or adjudication of the merits of this case.”

 

Original source: Read full article here

 

If something similar has happened to you call 1-800-JOB-LAWS or submit your information on this page.

 

 

Domino’s restaurants to pay $970,000 in overtime etc.

8 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

Owners of 29 Domino’s restaurants and the former owner of six stores have agreed to pay restitution totaling $970,000 to settle wage violations investigated by the state Attorney General’s Office.

 

Those covered by the settlement include the current or former owners of three Domino’s stores in Orange County: 50 Carpenter Ave. in Middletown, 711 Route 17M in Monroe, and 420 Windsor Highway in New Windsor, according to the Attorney’s General’s Office.

 

Robert Cookston owns 18 stores covered in the agreement, including the ones in New Windsor and Monroe. His company agreed to pay $675,000 in restitution. Ammar Jali was the former owner of the New Windsor, Monroe and Town of Wallkill stores. His company agreed to pay $60,000.

 

 

Read complete article here

EEOC Mediation is very successful

7 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

EEOC mediation is very successful. Its rate of resolving cases is over 70%. And the time from filing of charges to resolution is less than 100 days. The EEOC investigation process is taking from two to five years in our experience. So EEOC mediation makes sense.

 

 

If your employer has discriminated against you, the first thing you must do is go to the local Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) office and file charges. While there you should request mediation.

 

 

Mediation is an informal meeting between you and your employer and your employer’s attorney. The EEOC provides a neutral “helper” who is trained to help resolve discrimination claims by agreement or negotiation. So you should request mediation then call us at 1-800-917-4000 or 1-800-Job-Laws or submit your information on this website.

GO to EEOC Mediation! But not alone!

7 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

 

If you believe your employer has discriminated against you, the first thing you should do is go to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) and file charges. Shortly after the charges are file the EEOC may contact you and your employer and ask if you are interested in participating in mediation.

 

Mediation is an informal and confidential way to resolve the dispute. The EEOC provides a neutral mediator who is trained to help resolve these claims. The mediator does not make a legal ruling about who is right or wrong. It’s a free process. We highly recommend it. But we don’t recommend that you attend mediation without an attorney. If you have been offered EEOC mediation, please call us at 1-800-JOB LAWS.

If you are paid by the hour should you be paid more for overtime?

2 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

 

The answer is usually no. If you are paid by the hour the employer waives the right to claim that your are exempt under the executive, administrative or professional exemptions to the overtime law. The Department of Labor explains it very well in their Fact Sheet #17a. You can read it here

 

 

Calnet, Inc. sued for failure to pay Overtime

3 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

A lawsuit has been filed against Calnet, Inc. claiming failure to pay overtime and other violations of the California Labor Code.  The lawsuit entitled Solaiman Saifi v. Calnet, Inc. et al.  Case No. CIVDS1502150 was filed in the Superior Court of the State of California for the County of San Bernardino.

The lawsuit alleges that employees of Calnet worked long hours and were not paid overtime for all hours worked. According to the complaint, Calnet provided Fort Irwin Military Base with native role-players and interpreters who would aid the military in realistic pre-deployment training missions. Role players would occupy a simulated village, taking on the roles of the inhabitants of the village, or other required characters during the training missions. The employees are represented by Phillips Dayes National Employment Law Firm PC.

If you have information or would like information about this lawsuit or similar lawsuits, please submit your information to the right or call 1-800-JOB-LAWS. If you have a claim, it could be time barred if you wait.

Overtime lawsuit filed against Tatitlek

10 votes, 4.80 avg. rating (96% score)

 

Over 50 employees of Tatitlek Support Services and GeoNorth LLC have filed suit against the companies claiming failure to pay overtime and other violations of the California Labor Code.  The lawsuit entitled Rasool Abbas et al. v. Tatitlek Support Services, Inc. et al. Case No. 5: 15- cv-00489-R-KK was filed in the United States District Court for the Central District of California.

The lawsuit alleges that employees of Tatitlek worked long hours and were not paid overtime for all hours worked. According to the complaint, Tatitlek provided 29 Palms military base with native role-players and interpreters who would aid the Marines in realistic pre-deployment training missions. Role players would occupy a simulated village, taking on the roles of the inhabitants of the village, or other required characters during the training missions. The employees are represented by Phillips Dayes National Employment Law Firm PC.

If you have information or would like information about this lawsuit or similar lawsuits, please submit your information to the right or call 1-800-JOB-LAWS. If you have a claim, it could be time barred if you wait.

Restaurant workers may join lawsuit for failure to pay overtime

3 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

Grand King Buffet workers can join collective lawsuit over pay, overtime, judge says

 

 

By John Agar | [email protected]
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on March 27, 2015 at 11:29 AM

 

 

GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Current and former workers at Grand King Buffet Holland are eligible to join a lawsuit alleging workers were underpaid.

 

Marvin Sanchez Osorto and others filed a lawsuit in U.S. District Court in Grand Rapids alleging that workers were paid weekly flat rates of $400 to $600 for putting in 65- to 72-hour work weeks.

 

Read full article here

 

 

 

 

US Supreme Court holds pregnant workers have right to light duty

6 votes, 5.00 avg. rating (99% score)

Justices say pregnant workers can seek accommodations

 

Richard Wolf, USA TODAY1:56 p.m. EDT March 25, 2015

 

WASHINGTON — Pregnant workers can claim the same accommodations that employers grant to large numbers of similarly restricted workers, a divided Supreme Court ruled Wednesday.

 

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